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Autumn Negroni

February 26, 2012

When I was back in Chicago over Thanksgiving, Vikki, my sister Kelly and I took occasion to go to the Violet Hour — my favorite thus far of the Chicago cocktail bars, even if it is a faux-speakeasy. I’ve never really been into the whole  fake speakeasy idea, and am relieved that the trend seems to be dying. People sometimes forget that “pretense” is the root of “pretentious,” a fact I’m never more aware of as when I’m at a hidden, exclusive, “password-only” bar that I found by checking their address on yelp.

Regardless — once you find the stupid hidden door and wait at the stupid velvet curtain, actually being there is a very pleasant experience.

The standout drink I had there was called the Autumn Negroni, which on paper looked redundant. Five of the seven ingredients (71%) are bittering agents, and one could reasonably think that once you have Campari, Cynar, Fernet Branca, and Angostura Orange bitters, a dash of Peychaud’s seems like a waste of everyone’s time.

In practice, however, the bitters strip away individually and at different moments, yielding waves of flavors that make each each sip last like 10 seconds. Each ingredient picks up at the tails of the last one and carries the flavor for a while before handing off to another. It’s like a relay race, or cars of a train. This drink is so fucking good.

Autumn Negroni

2oz dry gin (Beefeater)
0.75oz Carpano Antica sweet vermouth
0.5oz Cynar
0.5oz Campari
0.25oz Fernet Branca
1 dash orange bitters (Angostura)
1 dash Peychaud’s bitters
Stir over ice and strain into coupe glass; garnish with orange peel.

I immediately asked them for the recipe, which they immediately gave me. Not to single out Saltbox, but I’ve made this drink for probably two dozen people, all of whom loved it, and all of whom now know where to get it if they ever find themselves in Chicago. I share recipes with anyone who asks. I firmly believe it makes all of us better.

Peychaud’s anise shows faintly on the nose alongside aromas of the sweet vermouth’s wine. But what’s so engaging about this drink is that you get to taste all the ingredients, more or less one after another. When taken, the sweetness of the amari mixes with the gin’s juniper, followed by the bittersweet Campari and the brightness of the orange bitters, but right when the Campari would turn rusty bitter that quarter ounce of Fernet Branca prickles up all peppermint and menthol, only to be batted back down by the long, earthy finish of the cynar.

Before this, I had no idea that bitters could layer in this way. I have since used this as the inspiration for the Mane of Needles, my favorite of the URBN cocktails and about which I’ll write soon.

This is the kind of drink that you keep going back to, keep taking small drinks because you identify something different in each sip, and when you feel like you’ve almost mapped all the flavors, you find there’s nothing left but sweetness on your lips and you have to do the whole thing all over again. Which is all I could ever ask from a cocktail. Four stars. A+.

10 Comments leave one →
  1. Rebecca Zearing permalink
    February 7, 2013 8:17 pm

    It is at once simply beautiful..perfect..the best of the best. Much appreciated. Your descriptors are exacting. Thank you once again for absolutely caring about your craft.

    • February 8, 2013 3:01 pm

      The caring part is my effortless pleasure. Thank you for reading, and also for coming and trying.

  2. Marc Siegel permalink
    March 7, 2013 6:27 pm

    Wanted to let you know I finally got around to buying the Cynar so I could make this delicious drink! I agree with Rebecca (prior post) that your description was perfect. The layering of flavors was excellent. I still think the minty-ness of the Fernet Branca is a bit overpowering, but it all works so well. Keep up the great work. I refer to your site frequently!

    • March 18, 2013 8:28 pm

      I can’t believe I missed this when you originally posted it! Sorry for the delay — that’s great news! Cynar is rapidly proving to be one of my favorite liqueurs on the shelf. It’s so versatile…

      Thanks for reading and trying. I’ve been on a minor hiatus because of other writing projects, but I’ve just finished them, so I’ll get back to this as soon as I can. Thanks again–

      –jason

  3. Chris permalink
    March 13, 2014 1:06 pm

    Wondering how that would taste if it’s barrel aged?! hmm.. Enjoying your posts. Keep it.
    Greetings from Denmark

    • March 14, 2014 5:04 pm

      I’ve tried it. It tastes amazing barrel-aged.

      Thanks for reading! I will!

  4. April 8, 2016 3:20 pm

    Hello – wow this sounds amazing! I already have gin, campari, fernet and bitters in my collection and so will need to explore the others now. Did you write a post about the Mane of Needles? I am intrigued. :o)

  5. Rebecca Zearing permalink
    September 21, 2016 6:22 pm

    Just talked bartender at Caffe Calabria into making us an Autumn Negroni. Jason best recipe ever…..

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  1. Negroni Variations | Tartines to Tikis

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